Category Archives: Ballot Access News

February 2016 edition of Ballot Access News now online

Ballot Access News

Today, Richard Winger, the founder and editor of Ballot Access News and a member of the Libertarian Party, released the February 2016 edition of his print newsletter online. The contents of the newsletter:

Table of Contents

  1. U.S. DISTRICT COURT ENJOINS CONNECTICUT BAN ON OUT-OF-STATE CIRCULATORS
  2. MICHIGAN ENDS STRAIGHT-TICKET
  3. PROCEDURAL WIN IN SOUTH DAKOTA BALLOT ACCESS CASE
  4. BALLOT ACCESS BILLS
  5. 72% OF ARIZONA LEGISLATORS BACK POPULAR VOTE PLAN
  6. MAINE LIBERTARIAN PARTY SUES
  7. ARIZONA TOP-TWO INITIATIVE STARTS TO CIRCULATE, BUT HAS LEGAL FLAWS
  8. ALASKA DEMOCRATS WANT TO LET INDEPENDENTS BE THEIR NOMINEES
  9. AMERICA VOTES 2014 IS NOW IN PRINT
  10. ELECTION LAW BILLS OF INTEREST
  11. BOOK REVIEW: PRIMARY POLITICS
  12. U.S. SUPREME COURT DENIES THREE BALLOT ACCESS CASES
  13. U.S. DISTRICT COURT DENIES RELIEF IN PENNSYLVANIA PRIMARY BALLOT ACCESS CASE
  14. 1914 VOTE FOR U.S. HOUSE
  15. PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY CANDIDATES WHO GOT ON BALLOTS IN JANUARY
  16. MIKE BLOOMBERG PONDERS INDEPENDENT CANDIDACY
  17. GARY JOHNSON DECLARES FOR THE LIBERTARIAN NOMINATION
  18. LIBERTARIAN PARTY GAINS A NEVADA STATE LEGISLATOR
  19. REFORM PARTY CONVENTION
  20. CHART ON 2016 PETITIONING
  21. JILL STEIN LIKELY TO RECEIVE PRIMARY MATCHING FUNDS IN FEBRUARY
  22. SUBSCRIBING TO BAN WITH PAYPAL

Read the full edition here.

Ballot Access News: Women’s Equality Party Refuses To Cross-Nominate Democratic Nominee In Upcoming New York Special Legislative Race

(The following was originally published in Ballot Access News.)

The Women’s Equality Party of New York is refusing to nominate the Democratic nominee in the April 19 special election for Assembly, 65th district. See this story. As far as is known, this is the first time the Women’s Equality Party has abstained from cooperating with the Democratic Party since the party was born in 2014. The Democratic nominee, Alice Cancel, is a woman.

HEDGES TO TAKE PART IN AIP PRIMARY

Prohibition Party nominee, James “Jim” Hedges is among those listed on the June 7 American Independent Party Presidential primary ballot in California. This marks the first time a Prohibition Presidential nominee has appeared on any statewide ballot in California since 1960.

The inclusion of Hedges on the AIP primary ballot is just another sign of the increased activity of the Prohibition Party during this election cycle.

Hedges expects an uphill fight in his bid to win the primary. However, he promises to campaign vigorously in the Golden State and is confident of a strong showing.

Ballot Access News: U.S. District Court Strikes Down Law Requiring New Parties to Run a Full Slate of Candidates

(The following was originally published by Richard Winger in Ballot Access News.)

On February 12, U.S. District Court Judge Andrea R. Wood issued a one-page order, granting the Illinois Libertarian Party’s motion for summary judgment that the Illinois full-slate law is unconstitutional. The decision will be issued later. The minute entry says, “For the reasons stated in the Memorandum Opinion and Order to follow, Plaintiffs’ motion for summary judgment is granted and Defendants’ motion for summary judgment is denied.”

The full-slate law was passed in 1931. It was probably passed to thwart the Communist Party, which had a very popular activist named Claude Lightfoot, a leader of Chicago’s African-American community. He received 33,337 votes for State Representative in 1932, not enough to win, but a strong showing. At the time Illinois used cumulative voting for State House elections. Each district elected three candidates. Each party was permitted to run either one, two, or three candidates. Voters each had three votes, and they could give one vote to each of three candidates, or they could accumulate their votes to give two votes to one person and one to another; or they could give all three votes to a single candidate. Illinois had been using this system since 1870.

The law passed in 1931 said a previously unqualified party (such as the Communist Party, which was never a qualified party in Illinois because it could never get 5% for any statewide race) had to run three candidates for State House, thus preventing such a party from taking advantage of cumulative voting to the fullest extent. The law barred the Communist Party from running just one candidate for State House in a district; it had to run three candidates in any district it contested. Of course voters were still free to give all three of their votes to the most popular Communist and ignore the other two. But the state had a straight-ticket device at the time, and voters who used the straight-ticket device for the Communist Party were splitting their three votes among all three Communist candidates, thus lessening the support for the one candidate that the party hoped might win.

Illinois stopped using cumulative voting in 1982, but the full-slate law remained on the books. It forced newly-qualifying parties to run a full slate of statewide candidates, whether they wanted to or not. For example, in midterm years, it forced such parties to run for Attorney General, if they wanted to run for Governor, even though the party might not have a qualified candidate for Attorney General (only attorneys can run for that position). In county partisan elections, it forced parties that wanted to run for any countywide executive positions to run for State’s Attorney.

Connecticut Libertarian Party wins court case to overturn ban on out-of-state petitioners

From LP.org, January 28th, 2016:

ImageThe Libertarian Party of Connecticut won a legal victory Wednesday (1/27/16) that allows them to hire out-of-state contractors to collect signatures for candidates petitioning their way onto the ballot. Continue reading

Texas Reform Party Notifies Secretary of State that it Intends to Try to Qualify in 2016

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From Richard Winger at Ballot Access News:

Texas has a unique law that says if a group intends to qualify as a political party, it must notify the Secretary of State by January 2 of the election year. The Reform Party of Texas recently filed this notice.